Amend the Constitution This page was last modified: April 23 2016 13:25:53.

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Is it time to amend the Constitution?

Other than an amendment regarding Congressional pay increases, ratified in 1992, the Constitution hasn't been changed since 1971. Too much recent legislation has been justified based on "common sense", or passed with a minimum majority. Is it time to force compromise by requiring a 60% vote for passage? At a time when professional politicians are serving 30-40 years, is it time to force term limits?

Term Limits

The intent of serving as a representative of the people is exactly that - to serve and to represent. It's hard to truly represent constituents when one is dependent on donors for re-election.

No Pensions

Current requirements to receive a Congressional pension are a minimum of 5 years service. That's a very strong incentive to win an election, and a very short period of time to serve to earn a lifetime retirement. Perhaps it's time for a few changes.

60% Vote

Currently, much legislation - at all levels of government - can be passed with a bare majority. If we require 60% approval for all new laws, it will force bi-partisan legislation, or at the least, overwhelming approval by the party in power. It will also decrease the number of laws in effect(which we can't possibly keep track of), wasted time and debate on bills with low support, and encourage discussion and compromise between the parties.

Reduce or Rescind Government Regulatory Power

Today, after 200+ years in operation, our government exercises massive control over our lives and businesses by the authority of the commerce clause in Article 1, Section 8, Clause 3 of the Constitution. How many more Americans would start a business and create new jobs if there were fewer requirements? How many Americans think it isn't worth the effort because of reporting requirements and government oversite? Maybe it's time to remove or severely restrict government's regulatory authority.


These are ideas that the vast majority of Americans can support. Regardless of party affiliation, most of us can agree to simple Amendments like these. Keep the wording simple and clear, avoid legal terminology so that we can all understand what we are voting to change, and this could be done.